Careers Advice Failing The State Sector

Dear Readers,

having read today’s article in the Evening Standard today about Careers Advice failing the state education sector in the UK, it struck me that perhaps portfolio workers could play a valuable role in proving to young people that there are alternative work options to the accepted norms.

Creating a generic Careers Service for all could have its benefits, but let’s hope they also encourage young people to look at a range of work options and not only force them down the route of a ‘socially acceptable” career. I pray that the new Careers Service proposed for creation next year will listen to creative thinkers such as Ken Robinson on the subject of preparing young people for their future.

They must embrace creativity, we are asking young people to prepare for a future career in an unknown world yet to happen, so they must be prepared for creativity and innovation.

 

Employment Sustainability

I met someone this weekend who is a great supporter of portfolio working for new entrants into the world of work. She works in a student careers office and when I described my portfolio work she immediately said that it was something she was suggesting to students to build up their CVs in the current economic climate.

This suggests the portfolio-working trend is on the increase. Students are following this as a career path to grow their work experience post-graduation and create a more sustainable working life in difficult times. I know from personal experience that even when the economy is good it is difficult as a graduate to find a graduate job. I recall the numerous rejection letters I and my university colleagues received before we finally found work. However, with the huge debt that students are already burdened with it is not surprising that several jobs might be needed to counterbalance the situation they are in.

One of the things I have been aiming towards in my portfolio work is ‘sustainability’. Making sure that the work I do can continue longer term, become established with good reputation, help me grow and develop professionally and sustain my living costs with money to spare. At the moment I am trying to combine this with ‘fiscal responsibility’ (mentioned on BBC Radio 4 recently) which means only spending what you can afford. Naturally risk taking is good too but we’ve all been seduced by the easy credit situation and look where that has got us.

Perhaps students will have to start thinking more about this too. Is it no longer realistic to move away from home to study? Can they study in their home town? Is university always the answer to a successful career? Are there alternatives? Traineeships? Apprenticeships?

I am also alarmed to hear on the grapevine recently that companies in the city of London are increasingly under pressure to import staff from their own countries to work in their London offices because British staff can’t speak foreign languages. Perhaps British students need to think more about this area of study to increase their chances of the career they want. It would seem the UK education system may not have considered the issues of employment sustainability in this country when they decided to end compulsory languages at GCSE.

Portfolio-working is more than just a way of work. It also raises many issues regarding employment sustainability, personal career choice, our impact on the economy and environment and our own futures. Perhaps this should be something recommended in job centres too? Or is it already? I’d love to hear from careers advisers at Job Centre Plus to find out.

My favourite Zeitgeist words for this blog:

  1. Portfolio-working
  2. Fiscal responsibility
  3. Employment sustainability

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